North Campus | Landscape Architecture Magazine

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Posted in ENVIRONMENT, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, ONLINE ONLY, PHOTOGRAPHY, PLANNING, RECREATION, SCHOOLS, STREETS, UNIVERSITY, tagged Artistic Director’s Cup, Gerstacker Grove, North Campus, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, University of Michigan on February 17th, 2022| Leave a comment ”

The things our creative director, Chris McGee, hated to omit from the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Levi Hutmacher, Michigan Engineering.

From Zach Mortice’s “Northern Star” in the February 2022 issue, about Stoss Landscape Urbanism’s Gerstacker Grove at the University of Michigan, the only major pedestrian-friendly landscape connective tissue feature on the former north campus centered on the car.

–CHRIS MCGEE, AML ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

As always, you can purchase this issue from Landscape Architecture Magazine in more than 250 bookstores, including many university and independent stores, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy unique digital numbers for just $5.25 at Zinio Where order single copies of the printed issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for AML cost $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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Posted in ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, FEATURES, HISTORY, PLANTS, RECREATION, SCHOOLS, UNIVERSITY, WATER, tagged Bioretention Basin, Chris Reed, Eda U. Gerstacker Grove, lighting, North Campus, Parametric Design, Quad, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, University of Michigan, Zach Mortice February 15, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

Gerstacker Grove is the only major piece of landscaped connective tissue on the University of Michigan’s North Campus. Photo by Millicent Harvey.

The Eda U. Gerstacker Grove on the University of Michigan North Campus is the modern anti-quad. North Campus is cloistered and suburban, separated from the main Central Campus by over a mile and the Huron River. This is the school house college of engineering, school of architecture, school of performing arts and several university residences. The campus is over 50 years old, but until 2016 when the grove was completed, its central core was an indiscriminate patch of trees and walkways with little or no civic presence.

Unlike the quieter Central Campus (known as Central Campus Diag because of its sloping but axial tree-lined walkways), the grove is a landscape that is to do things while inviting passers-by to to do things as well as. The landscape filters and retains rainwater, stimulates biodiversity and puts on a light show at night and when it rains. Meanwhile, University of Michigan students can try out the swings or toss shoes for a game of sand volleyball. the Stoss landscape planning Gerstacker Grove’s design connects the 800-acre campus, linking natural systems with the built environment and creating an unmistakable campus hub.

“With a lot of these moves, we’re trying to play against or against the traditional quad,” says Chris Reed, FASLA, founder and director of Stoss. The quads are visions of collegiate life, where autumn breezes flutter golden-hued leaves across wide lawns defined by stately, historic buildings. As space experiments, they can be loaded with a nostalgia powerful enough to bring together alumni from everywhere, and images of college quad bikes adorn many fundraising emails. But they have limited utility on their own, Reed says; they are especially good for “image and circulation”.

But not Gerstacker Grove. With its varied topography and parametric design elements, the grove pushes the boundaries of technological capability, ecological performance, and the expressive imagination of landscape architecture. Who wouldn’t want a brand new quad if it looks like the $6.9 million Gerstacker Grove? (Continued…)

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Posted in CITIES, CLIMATE, ECOLOGY, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, HISTORY, ONLINE ONLY, PARKS, PLANTS, RECREATION, UNIVERSITY, tagged Cedar Rapids, Jeff Speck, North Campus, Quad, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, canopy, University of Michigan on February 1, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

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FOREGROUND

An awning where it counts (planning)
After a storm devastates the urban forest in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the city enlists Confluence and ASLA honorary Jeff Speck to help it push back harder.

CHARACTERISTICS

North Star
The University of Michigan’s mid-century North Campus was an emblem of then-current campus design—suburban and car-centric, but lacking a sense of place. With a few deft moves, Stoss Landscape Urbanism’s redesign of the central quad brought light, texture and topographic drama, and the students followed suit.

The complete February table of contents is available here.

As always, you can purchase this issue from Landscape Architecture Magazine in more than 250 bookstores, including many university and independent stores, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy unique digital numbers for just $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue of ASLA. Annual subscriptions for AML cost $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye here on the blog, on the AML Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we will be posting articles from February as the month progresses.

Credits: Cover photo and “Northern Star”, Millicent Harvey; ‘An awning where it counts’, Todd Bannor/Alamy Stock Photo.

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