January | 2022 | Landscape Architecture Magazine

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Posted in ECOLOGY, EDUCATION, ENVIRONMENT, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, ONLINE ONLY, PHOTOGRAPHY, PLANNING, PLANTS, RECREATION, REGION, RESILIENCE, SOIL, SPECIES, VIEWS, WILDLIFE, tagged Art Director’s Cut, Aurora, Colorado, HANIYA RAE, prairie, Prairie Conservation Center on January 18, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

Things our Art Director, Chris McGee, hated to omit from the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Scott Dressel-Martin.

Excerpt from “Prairie Primetime” by Haniya Rae in the January 2022 issue, about the Prairie Conservation Center in Aurora, Colorado, where a map by Mundus Bishop reveals this shortgrass prairie as a thriving place for ecological education.

–CHRIS MCGEE, AML ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

As always, you can purchase this issue from Landscape Architecture Magazine in more than 250 bookstores, including many university and independent stores, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy unique digital numbers for just $5.25 at Zinio Where order single copies of the printed issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for AML cost $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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Posted in BROWNFIELDS, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, FEATURES, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, ONLINE ONLY, PHOTOGRAPHY, RECREATION, REGION, RESILIENCE, SHORELINE, VIEWS, WATER, WILDLIFE, tagged Alabama, Art Director’s Cup, Deepwater Horizon, Gulf State Park , Jared Brey, Oil spill on January 14, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

Things our Art Director, Chris McGee, hated to omit from the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Billy Pope, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Excerpt from “Roll, Tide” by Jared Brey in the January 2022 issue, about Gulf State Park in Alabama, where Deepwater Horizon oil spill compensation is flowing to coastal remediation projects.

–CHRIS MCGEE, AML ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

As always, you can purchase this issue from Landscape Architecture Magazine in more than 250 bookstores, including many university and independent stores, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy unique digital numbers for just $5.25 at Zinio Where order single copies of the printed issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for AML cost $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Read full article »

Posted in CITIES, CLIMATE, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, NOW, PLANNING, PLANTS, REAL ESTATE, REGULATIONS, RESILIENCE, STREETS, TRANSPORT, tagged Arizona, car independence, cars, courses, Culdesac Tempe, Floor Associates, Kristina Floor, light rail, Mixed -Use, paseos, Tempe, Timothy Schuler on January 11, 2022| Leave a comment ”

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, AML will make available to readers selected stories in Spanish.

It’s probably a fantasy of a number of landscape architects: to design an entire neighborhood without having to consider a single car. Housing blocks separated not by wide streets congested with traffic, but by gentle, shaded paseos or promenades. Apartments opening onto European-style courtyards. Every square foot of open space devoted to people.

Kristina Floor, FASLA, builds this dream. Over the past two years, she and her team of floor associates, who is based in Phoenix, led the site design for Culdesac Tempe, a 16-acre, 761-unit mixed-use development in Tempe, Ariz., in which private cars are prohibited. Comprised of two- and three-story apartment buildings arranged around courtyards, the development has no garages, no “parking podiums” – the latest urban bypass that hides all parking on the lower levels of a otherwise mundane development – and nothing you’d even call a street, which ultimately leaves plenty of room for people’s space.

“What happens on so many projects, with the amount of parking you have to put in, is that most of your landscape is perimeter landscape or parking lot landscape,” says Floor. At Culdesac, which is under construction and will open in the summer of 2022, Floor says they’re “designing spaces for people.” (Following…)

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Posted in BOOKS, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, GARDENS, HEALING GARDENS, PLANTS, HOBBY, THE BACK, tagged Georgina Reid, Journal, Leah Ghazarian, Print, The Planthunter, Wonderground on January 6, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

A printed journal is the next step for The plant hunter Georgina Reid.

Shortly after the pandemic shutdowns in Australia, Georgina Reid, editor of The plant hunter web magazine, got tired of words on a screen.

“The stories that I want people to actually read and think about and sit on, they don’t have a natural home online,” says Reid, a landscape artist who writes about the connection between people and plants – stories stories that are often out of place. So Reid had a thought, “Maybe this needs to be printed.”

The parts in Wonder, the journal born in his studio by the river, are pensive and driving, sometimes heartbreaking. They form collections of works made to be held in the hands and tasted deliciously and not all at once.

“It’s about telling stories that challenge how we see ourselves in the world, that inspire us to create the future we want to live in – it’s as simple as that and as complex as that,” says Reid. (Following…)

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Posted in CITIES, ENVIRONMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, NOW, PARKS, PEOPLE, PLANNING, RECREATION, THE CLIENT, tagged Baltimore, Byoung-Suk Kweon, community development, Druid Heights, Druid Heights Community Development Coporation, Gold Street Park, Kim O’Connell, landscape architecture students, pro bono January 4, 2022 | Leave a comment ”

A new pocket park in Baltimore is helping spark a neighborhood revitalization.

In a corner of Baltimore surrounded by vacant lots and shuttered buildings, Gold Street Park is easy to miss. Built on a former coal yard in the Druid Heights neighborhood, the pocket park features a winding brick path that leads to a circular gathering space with a mural at its center. Steps along one edge can be used as seating or a de facto stage, and the simple planting scheme includes a few rose bushes and serviceberries.

Druid Heights is a historic African-American community that once had a thriving social scene, where jazz great Cab Calloway sang “Hi De Ho Man” in clubs, and wealthy black families raised their children. In the late 1960s, the uprisings following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. led to a period of urban divestment from which the community is still struggling to recover. A local non-profit association, the Druid Heights Community Development Corporation, takes a holistic approach to revitalization through property development, food and job assistance, and incentives and pathways to home ownership.

Among the barriers Druid Heights faces is a lack of green space: tree canopy coverage in the community is 14%, barely half the city average. To remedy this, the community has partnered with Byoung-Suk Kweon, ASLA, associate professor of landscape architecture at the University of Maryland, on a community green master plan that includes the development of pocket parks and larger green corridors and connections. (Following…)

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Posted in ECOLOGY, ECONOMY, ENVIRONMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, HISTORIC LANDSCAPES, ONLINE ONLY, PARKS, PHOTOGRAPHY, PRACTICAL, RECREATION, REGION, RESILIENCE, SHORELINE, TECH, WATER, tagged Alabama, BIM, Colorado, Gulf State Park, Mundus Bishop, Plains Conservation Centre, Prairie, What’s New January 3, 2022| Leave a comment ”

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FOREGROUND

“I” is for information (Tech)
Focusing on the building and the model can overlook the many new approaches landscape architects are taking to incorporate detailed site information into BIM projects.

CHARACTERISTICS

Prairie Prime Time
When Mundus Bishop was selected to upgrade public access to the Plains Conservation Center, a shortgrass prairie preserve in Colorado, the pandemic was still two years away. Social distancing made the center a destination for nearby Aurora residents, so the design team kept the
focus on the delicate balance between people and the prairie.

Roll, Tide
A decade after the Deepwater Horizon explosion killed 11 workers and spilled 134 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, the Gulf Coast’s fragile economy and environment have resurfaced, thanks to billions of dollars in remittances and federal support. A rebuilt lodge at the area’s top attraction, Gulf State Park, backed by a Sasaki master plan, came to represent
all that money can and cannot be returned.

The complete January table of contents is available here.

As always, you can purchase this issue from Landscape Architecture Magazine in more than 250 bookstores, including many university and independent stores, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy unique digital numbers for just $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue of ASLA. Annual subscriptions for AML cost $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye here on the blog, on the AML Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we will be posting articles from January as the month progresses.

Credits: “Prairie Primetime”, Scott Dressel-Martin; “Roll, Tide,” Matthew Arielly; “’I’ is for information,” Lauren Schmidt, ASLA.

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