Five winning projects of the AIA Regional & Urban Design Awards 2021 | News

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Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Five projects from across the United States have been announced as winners of the 2021 AIA Regional and Urban Design Award. The program aims to showcase the best of urban design, regional and urban planning and community development.

The Boston-based company Payette managed to win two trophies this year for its interdisciplinary science and engineering complex at Northeastern University in Boston as well as for its urban interventions in Lynn, Massachusetts.

Read on for an overview of the winning projects.

Beyond the Walls, Lynn, MA
Payette

Beyond the Walls by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Beyond the Walls by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Beyond the Walls by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Beyond the Walls by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Excerpt from the project: “Exploring how designers can activate connection through multiple interventions in the built environment, this project, a volunteer effort, rallied the citizens of Lynn, Massachusetts, around art as a vital source. public engagement and civic improvement. This, the team partnered with Beyond Walls, a collection of engaged citizens, to develop five distinct interventions. The emergence of COVID-19 prompted the more recent two, but together they have significantly strengthened the bond between the citizens of Lynn and their physical environment while providing the corollary effects of improved pedestrian safety and potential. ~ Learn more about this project here.

Essex Crossing, New York, NY
SHOP ARCHITECTS

Essex Crossing by SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects

Essex Crossing by SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects

Essex Crossing by SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects

Essex Crossing by SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects

Project Excerpt: “On 20 acres of land once owned by the city, SHoP and Beyer Blinder Belle’s collaborative team have created a vibrant but respectful contribution to life on New York’s Lower East Side. Fueled by a vision that orchestrates the development of nine-empty sites, this plan includes more than 2 million square feet of commercial, retail and community space that will keep this historic and vibrant neighborhood alive. […] In 2013, the team was selected through a city-initiated public tendering process, joining three well-known developers to develop a plan for the largest undeveloped land south of 96th Street. . Fifty percent of the plan’s residential spaces are designated as permanent affordable housing, with priority given to those relocated in the 1950s and 1960s. ”~ Learn more about this project here.

Haxtun – Saving Main Street, Haxtun, CO
HDR

Haxtun - Saving the Main Street by HDR © Tom Trenolone AIA, HDR Inc.

Haxtun – Saving the Main Street by HDR © Tom Trenolone AIA, HDR Inc.

Haxtun - Saving the Main Street by HDR © Tom Trenolone AIA, HDR Inc.

Haxtun – Saving the Main Street by HDR © Tom Trenolone AIA, HDR Inc.

Excerpt from the project: “As in many other small communities across America, the local health care system and its medical centers are one of the largest employers in Haxtun, Colo. The population of Haxtun is only 1 000 residents and the Haxtun Hospital District employs more than 120 and welcomes around 20 additional volunteers. This plan explores what could happen if this labor force were redirected to occupy the existing storefronts and buildings on Haxtun’s main street. that the team envisioned may not only save Haxtun, but countless rural communities across the country whose hospitals are threatened with closure. The plan aims to redistribute population density across the center of the community to support these often overlooked places and their medical centers. In Haxtun, the team conceptualized their ideas on a 3.3 acre site, roughly the size of a city block. mix of nearly 20,000 square feet of adaptive reuse and over 50,000 square feet of new construction to achieve target population density. ~ Learn more about this project here.

Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex, Boston, MA
Payette

Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Northeastern University Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex by Payette © Warren Jagger Photography

Excerpt from the project: “Flow and movement are the defining characteristics of this new college district straddling Boston’s Roxbury and Fenway neighborhoods. social space for students. Built on an industrial wasteland, this new university building, called ISEC, and its accompanying pedestrian bridge is the first major project informed by the university’s institutional master plan. The complex sits south of one of the city’s main rail corridors, serving as a literal bridge between two different neighborhoods and a symbol of the school’s desire to strengthen the communities around it. The new pedestrian bridge, playfully known as the PedX, and its surrounding landscape provide an accessible walkway over the lanes where the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and Amtrak provide service. Pedestrians are greeted with a gentle incline, shieldin g all views from the rail corridor, which eventually leads them to the 500-foot free-form bridge that connects directly to the new building. ~ Learn more about this project here.

Rebuilding a Local Food Economy: Oahu, Hawai’i, Island of Oahu, HI
University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Rebuilding a Local Food Economy: Oahu, Hawai'i By the University of Arkansas Community Design Center © University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Rebuilding a Local Food Economy: Oahu, Hawai’i By the University of Arkansas Community Design Center © University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Rebuilding a Local Food Economy: Oahu, Hawai'i By the University of Arkansas Community Design Center © University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Rebuilding a Local Food Economy: Oahu, Hawai’i By the University of Arkansas Community Design Center © University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Excerpt from the project: “Despite being the most populous landmass in the world, Hawaii imports over 93% of its food. This plan aims to rebuild local food systems on Oahu, the third largest of the Hawaiian Islands and home to nearly a million Working closely with the state’s Department of Agriculture, a diverse team of architects, d city ​​planners, farmers, landscape architects and food scientists embraced the idea of ​​“think like an island” to create an innovative platform for the development of value-added short foods. supply chains in Oahu. While food planning is often seen as a rural problem and is conspicuously absent from US planning and policy, access to food is intrinsically linked to the health problems and problems encountered in urban settings. Before the rise of industrial agriculture, local food processing and distribution centers were plentiful in American cities, ensuring both essential nutrition and agricultural prosperity. Cities have become less resilient and prone to significant nutritional deficits. “~ Learn more about this project here.


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