ASLA Professional Awards | Landscape Architecture Magazine

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Posted in ASLA, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, GREEN ROOFS, ONLINE ONLY, RECREATION, VIEWS, tagged ASLA Professional Awards, Boulders, Design Workshop, General Design Award of Excellence, geology, Mike Albert, Natural History Museum of Utah, sandstone on January 25 , 2022| Leave a comment ”

AML highlights raised and professional winners of the 2021 ASLA Awards by asking designers to share a snippet that tells an important part of their project’s narrative.

Utah Museum of Natural History: A Museum Without Walls

Design workshop

General Design Excellence Award

Image courtesy of Design Workshop, Inc.

“The Natural History Museum sits on the threshold of urban and natural lands. An early sketch illustrates how the multi-storey modern building fits into the steep hillside, with each level providing an opportunity to visually and physically engage with the natural landscape through abstract tectonic-like interventions that extend the program and interior use.

—Mike Albert, design studio

About Utah Museum of Natural History:

With a location chosen for its cross-section of geological, ecological, and cultural landscape features, the Utah Museum of Natural History Landscape contains 180 feet of vertical drop on a 17-acre site in the foothills of the Wasatch Mountains. The design team divided the sloping site with locally sourced red sandstone gabion walls, and seeds collected from plants disturbed by the construction of the building were planted when the dust settled. Environmental features of the museum include a campus with one of the largest solar panel installations in Utah, a green roof, and two 10,000 gallon cisterns for irrigation. Through grading and revegetation, 90% of the disturbed area of ​​the site has been restored. At the museum, a set of monolithic boulders tell the region’s geological history in scorching heat, endless pressure and eras, and an “earth terrace” functions as an outdoor classroom supported by glass that reflects its surroundings. of powerful beauty. Mirroring the mountain, the museum landscape is also constructed with the same geological building blocks as the Wasatch Range itself, bringing its meditation on place, time and perspective on a loop.

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